Youth – AEGEE-Europe | European Students' Forum AEGEE (Association des Etats Généraux des Etudiants de l’Europe / European Students’ Forum) is a student organisation that promotes cooperation, communication and integration amongst young people in Europe. As a non-governmental, politically independent, and non-profit organisation AEGEE is open to students and young people from all faculties and disciplines – today it counts 13 000 members, active in close to 200 university cities in 40 European countries, making it the biggest interdisciplinary student association in Europe. Wed, 15 Nov 2017 17:59:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.11 Young people gathered to debate solutions to key challenges on the Day of Europe /aegee30/ Mon, 01 Jun 2015 16:39:36 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=1308 In the beginning of May, celebrations of Europe Day took place across the continent. Commemorating the 65th anniversary of the Schuman Declaration provided an opportunity for Europe to reflect on all the strides that have been made in terms of cooperation and integration. While it cannot be disputed that significant progress has been made, it is crucial to be critical and to be aware that many more achievements have to be made for the European Project to be considered a success. As European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker pointed out: ‘The European Union was born in the aftermath of a terrible war and we still live in an unpredictable world. Robert Schuman’s words therefore remain as valid today, as they were at the time.’

AEGEEans in the EESC

In order to respond to numerous challenges Europe is facing today, over 100 young people gathered in European Economic and Social Committee on the occassion of Europe Day to discuss different issues with stakeholders ranging from representatives of the civil society to the representatives of the European Commission. The aim of the conference, titled ‘Schuman declaration 65 years later – wishes of the young generation for Europe’, was for young people to develop  recommendations for future action on European integration (social, economic and political), democratic innovations and active citizenship,  as well as on education and learning mobility.

Discussions during the conference brought attention to critical issues that European institutions must address at this point. Pointing out the increasing rise of populism and nationalism as a consequence of the crisis that many believe was mishandled by the European institutions, one of the proposals called for the creation of a ‘European Republic’ and a need for European citizen-based solutions to European problems. The proposal emphasized the importance of citizens’ involvement in transnational political debates and decision-making processes. Voting

Such processes were challenged, as participants of the conference called for a more inclusive voting system for European Parliamentary elections, proposing Member States to standardize their EP election systems and requesting greater accountability of the European Commission by introducing the direct election of the European Commission President by the European citizens.

The importance of fighting corruption on the European level was also tackled. While corruption is significantly lower in some Member States than others, it is still present to some degree in each of them, and presents a widespread concern among citizens. Young Europeans want to see a change urgently and wish for stronger actions such as the creation of an independent committee that would periodically check on the level of corruption in each Member State.

One of the most controversial proposals called for the EU Member States to introduce unconditional basic income in order to improve living standards and ensure that all citizens have the possibility to be active participants in society. While unconditional basic income is still perceived as a controversial idea, some have argued that its implementation on the European level could be feasible, and it shows that young people require more action to balance social inequality.

In line with that, gender inequality was also acknowledged as an important issue, as importance of education and greater awareness about the issue was emphasized, as well as empowering women in all professions. Young people expressed their concern about the Maternity Leave Directive, currently blocked by the Council, and have issued an urgent call for action on this matter. It is time for Europe to start acting, and not only talking about gender equality!

ParticipantsThe empowerment of citizens was a recurring topic, as one of the proposals highlighted the importance of a common European civic education. The Commission and Member States should adopt the initiative, as it would increase active participation of citizens, thus creating citizens who make informed choices and take a proactive approach in different issues they consider important.

Emphasis on active citizenship is not the only improvement young people are hoping to see in the education systems of Europe. The quality of education and opportunities for mobility are crucial as they contribute greatly to professional and personal development. Several proposals emphasized the importance of recognition of non-formal education, and especially the recognition of practical experiences of students in NGOs. The education system must change in order to adapt to today’s reality, where students are often learning more outside of classrooms than in class.

Another proposal was the creation of big European research centres across Europe, carrying out research in all fields of study. These centres should receive constant funding in order to preserve the autonomy of research and to guarantee a future in Europe to the best researchers, especially young researchers, from all European countries. There was a strong call to stop cutting on education and research, and to invest in excellence and inclusion.

The outcome of this conference shows that young people have a deep understanding of a great variety of issues Europe is facing with and that they are able to think beyond their pressing need for employment. It is time for institutions to acknowledge the capacity of young people to address relevant problems and their enthusiasm to offer solutions. Young people should be actively involved in decision-making processes and should be able to influence the future of their Europe.

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What about a youth dimension to policy-making? /what-about-a-youth-dimension-to-policy-making/ Thu, 01 May 2014 08:08:52 +0000 /?p=5113

by Monica Nica

From the border with Italy we were accompanied by “the Emerald Beauty”, one of the rare rivers in the world that retain the emerald-green colour throughout their length. The beauty of the scenery on the way to Ljubljana was only matched by the beauty of the Slovenian people we have met. They gladly welcomed us within their already busy schedule, as AEGEE Ljubljana had an exchange with AEGEE Groningen during the weekend.

The 20 young people of AEGEE Groningen made their way to Ljubljana hitchhiking, in teams of two – some for just 16 hours, other for 2 days. Even the ones who arrived the latest and had to sleep in a gas station, wholeheartedly recommended hitchhiking as a means of travelling: ‘it’s something everyone should try at least once’. As I have never hitchhiked, I asked the young travellers how can one get a ride and who usually gives rides. The answers were unanimous: getting a ride is all about luck; you can stay in a gas station for 10 minutes or for 2 hours until you find someone going your way that is also willing to take you. The people giving rides to hitchhikers are very diverse, from businessmen to hippies and from families to truck drivers. Apparently, businessmen doing this are in large numbers, as they usually travel alone. This reveals an only natural human need for connection with others, as not even businessmen are not islands.

Although they had a full schedule during the day, the young Dutch people lived up to their AEGEE reputation of being the most active and engaged, which sometimes can attract sneers from other nationalities. Their active participation rendered some interesting, and at times heated discussions. Since it was a stop scheduled last minute, there was not a certain topic requested. Instead, we decided to talk with the participants about all the topics. They were divided in five groups, each receiving a question to discuss upon, after which they had to present their conclusion to the rest of the people, engaging them in the debate as well.

DSC01379One of the questions – what is the best way to defend your interests as a young person? – had a very strong opinionated respondent. Although he was as strongly contested by the rest of the group, he did not seem to budge. One of the controversial things he said was that young people protest for the wrong things, like some war in Africa or GMOs. He was trying to say that young people should focus on things closer to them, which have a more easily noticeable impact upon their lives. Also, he asserted that they should act as part of a bigger association because as individuals is harder to make a meaningful change.

This discussion made me think about another debate: should policy-making have a youth dimension, just like there is a gender or an environment one? The proponents argue that approaching youth issues in a coherent and united manner would bolster youths’ voice, giving it a stronger standing in the negotiations of different policies. I agree that lobbying as one group can be beneficial on issues where there is a common denominator. At the same time, young people are very diverse and have opinions which differ to a large extent on many issues. In cases like these, having one voice can be detrimental to the ones which do not fit in the general agreed position. The risk of exclusion from a united youth position would be especially high for young people from disadvantaged backgrounds, like migrants, ethnic minorities, those at risk of poverty or social exclusion. And this exclusion would be no different than the general feeling of exclusion from mainstream forms of influencing decision-making young people presently have.

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Common parliament, different rules /common-european-parliament-different-rules/ /common-european-parliament-different-rules/#comments Thu, 30 Jan 2014 14:49:41 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=905 In the light of the forthcoming elections to the European Parliament, AEGEE organises different local and European level activities within the Y Vote 2014 Project to raise awareness of the elections and to increase young voters’ turnout.  As a result of various discussions, opinion exchanges and comparisons, several concerns about eligibility for participation in the European elections in each Member State have been identified. Namely, the rules that determine requirements for minimum age to be allowed to vote and to stand as a candidate differ from country to country. Should these inconsistencies exist is a controversial question.

Since the requirements for participation in the elections are established by national law, there are substantial disparities among the Member States. Firstly, the age necessary to be eligible to vote for the EP is 18 in all Member States, with an exception of Austria, where since 2009 16-year-olds are allowed to vote. This means that Austrian youth has greater potential to influence the composition of the EP in comparison with the rest of young people aged 16-17. Moreover, their interests and demands are presumably louder, more visible and taken into account at least in the pre-election stage. This creates inequality among European youth from different EU countries that is not justified, and therefore poses questions about the consequences this situation may cause.

Secondly, there are considerable age differences for candidates to be eligible to stand in the European elections. For example, in the situation when it is theoretically possible to find Danish MEP aged 18, Italians are obliged to wait seven more years to exercise the same right because in Italy the minimum age to be allowed to stand as a candidate in the EP elections is 25. This is worrying because even though MEPs are elected and gain the mandate in the Member State where they candidate, they form single legislative body that represents all EU citizens. Thus, a 18-years-old parliamentarian from Denmark votes upon the laws and rules that are binding in Italy, while an 18-years-old Italian can not. It does not seem fair, nevertheless the current electoral provisions draw exactly such picture.

Here you can see infographics from the website Europe Decides which shows clearly the complexity of the situation and the inequalities existing among countries (click on the image to enlarge):

For the Member States, it is obvious and technically easier to adjust the rules regarding the minimum age to vote and stand for the European elections with the rules that regulate national, regional and/or local elections. But in AEGEE we believe that more equality, consistency and uniformity is required within the Union, therefore we would appreciate if both parties, Members States and EU institutions, take necessary steps in this direction. Accordingly, AEGEE is committed to further be involved in addressing this issue and give recommendations that conform to our vision.

Importantly, this opinion does not touch other requirements for voters and candidates in each Member State and factors such as access to civic education, the level of youth involvement, and the interest in democratic processes, politics and other aspects, that may explain the existing differences in the national rules; however there are strong grounds to raise this discussion in order to make the EU more united.

Written by Diana Ondža, Communications Manager of the AEGEE-Europe Y Vote 2014 Project

 

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EVA: Does Erasmus make you a better European citizen? /eva-erasmus-european-citizen-elections/ Tue, 22 Oct 2013 09:57:24 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=782 The first meeting of the Erasmus Voting Assesment project (EVA) took place last week in Brussels, at the office of AEGEE-Europe.  This new project aims at answering fundamental questions concerning active citizenship and participation in democratic processes of young students, and in particular the ERASMUS students. Through an in-depth survey, the project will measure the feeling of “being European” among young students and, furthermore, assess any possible existing correlation between having been an ERASMUS student and the level of engagement in the European society. In addition, this project aims to investigate the voting behaviour of Erasmus and university students across Europe in the European Parliament’s elections.

AEGEE-Europe/European Students’ Forum, The Erasmus Student Network (ESN) and Generation Europe Foundation partnered up and launched this new project, funded in September 2013 by the European Commission’s Lifelong Learning Programme.

The coordinator of the project, AEGEE-Europe, hosted the kick-off conference in its office in Brussels. The consortium discussed the main project milestones, and some of the first decisions were already taken. There will be 3 study visits in December to three big European universities, recognised for hosting thousands of Erasmus students: Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain), Sciences PO Toulouse (France) and Aarhus Universitet (Denmark). A conference in January 2014 with mark the official presentation of the project, involving relevant policy makers and stakeholders, and presenting the survey. The official website for the project will be also launched in January 2014.

The project consortium is supported by an Advisory Board consisting by two European associations with relevant experience in the field of European citizenship and in sociological research: European Movement International (EMI) and the European Sociological Association (ESA).

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Let’s give peace an opportunity /lets-give-peace-an-opportunity/ Sat, 21 Sep 2013 09:47:25 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=733 Have you heard of World Peace Day? Today we celebrate the annual day of global ceasefire and non-violence. 21 September become the official International Day of Peace in 2001, before it was changing dates.

But the United Nations count for this day with an incredible ally, the Peace One Day organization which works to make this day a real success and to have a bigger impact than just a red mark in your calendars. The guy who started the initiative, Jeremy Gilley, has mobilised in the last 15 years thousands of people to really make this day an opportunity for peace in many conflict areas of the world. Together with them, the impact has reached 280 millions of people last year through 6000 events, including concerts, sport matches and workshops.

Here you can see some more about the project: www.peaceoneday.org

Click on the image to see the video

 

We in AEGEE support peace but we do not have many opportunities to contribute. This year, however, we start on the same Peace Day something big. We are joining the University of Youth and Development (UJyD) in Mollina (Malaga, Spain) where we will host a Peace Bilding training focused on the Caucasus region. The multicultural environment of the UJyD will serve as a great framework where we can build up bridges among the youth of the Caucasus region and foster mutual understanding. We hope the outcome of this training course are positive and we will build up a bigger strategy in the next months. In the end we would like to give Peace not only a day in the calendar, but a home everywhere in Europe.

The University of Youth and Development is an initiative of  the North South Center of the Council of Europe, with the support of the European Youth Forum (YFJ), the Spanish Youth Council (CJE), the Latin American Youth Forum (FLAJ) and the Spanish Youth Institute (INJUVE).

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Impressions on the EP plenary on Youth Employment /impressions-on-the-ep-plenary-on-youth-employment/ Wed, 11 Sep 2013 06:54:40 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=717 Yesterday the European Parliament held a session dedicated to Youth Unemployment. It was a very interesting session to follow, where almost all voices agreed on some points such as the seriousness of the situation in some of the countries and regions and the need for a strong action from the European Union.

We learned at the very beginning that the Lithuanian Presidency has adopted Social Inclusion of NEETs (youth Not in Education, Employ or Training) as its priority on Youth policy. We in AEGEE celebrate this decision.

Commissioner László Andor began by presenting all the actions taken on the European Level to revert the trend of destruction of jobs. Here, the initiatives included in the Youth Employment Package and developed in the Youth Employment Initiative, were showcased; namely the Youth Guarantee Scheme and the European Alliance for Apprenticeships. Later interventions however remarked the fact that independent studies have shown the big gap between the necessary funding and the amount allocated from European budget. This was supposed to be covered by countries but it is not certain it will happen, risking the success of these measures.

MEPs more on the left side blamed the conservative parties of being hypocrites for asking for solutions to the problem of youth unemployment, while they are responsible for it (at least partially) through the imposition of austerity measures.

According to many MEPs the solution to the problem of unemployment has to be based in investment. The necessary austerity measures should not apply to areas such as education, entrepreneurship, I+D… which require strong investments to start working full steam again.

Moreover, some MEPs highlighted the risk of placing the young Europeans on a terrible dilemma. The one of having to choose between a badly paid job and no job at all. Moreover, those work-for-free schemes such as internships have become sometimes traps for our youth, and they do not lead to stable jobs after the learning process because another intern covers the same place.

In the end, it was a very interesting plenary because the different speakers showed up that, even on such a critical point of the political agenda, they are divided and there are contradictory positions. Something that young voters will take into account for sure when deciding their vote in the next elections. We in AEGEE will give Employment a great focus in our new project Y Vote 2014, which aims at empowering young people to make an informed choice during the European Parliament elections by undertaking actions both on European and local level.

Time now to follow the State of the European Union plenary. You can follow it here.

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Welcome, Croatia! /croatia-eu-welcome/ Mon, 01 Jul 2013 16:10:06 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=644 During the last week of June we have been warming up for welcoming Croatia in the European Union: the European institutions have focused big part of their communication in introducing the new member to the rest of the club through figures, infographics and cool videos highlighting the assets of Croatia or sharing the impressions of some relevant European politicians (part 1 and Part 2), or promoting the whole idea of enlargement itself.

 

Commissioners welcoming Croatia (click to see video)

Moreover. the European Commission held a Youth conference in Zagreb last week, where 80 AEGEE members, and dozens of young Europeans from other NGOs, could meet representatives of the European Commission, the European Youth Forum, and other stakeholders from the European and national (Croatian) level. Topics as entrepreneurship and unemployment, the challenges for the Croatian youth in the new reality, or the advantages and disadvantages of a Croatia inside the EU28 were some of the raised topics. There was also time for a creativity workshop where European youth had to prepare videos with positive messages about enlargement. The results were impressive and gave bright ideas which maybe we will see implemented in future EU campaigns.

Today, Croatia closes a chapter in its history and opens a new one, one where Croatians will be part again of something bigger. For some people, the shadow of the Yugoslavian past is still felt. There are those who fear a dilution of national identity. But the EU is different to Yugoslavia, in the EU28 diversity is an added value, art and culture will be celebrated, and the language will be preserved.

Croatia comes however with a list of challenges that cannot be ignored. Youth unemployment over 50% makes it third of the EU28 list, after Spain and Greece. while 5 years of recession have weakened the economy. The enthusiasm for the EU has decreased lately and in the first elections for the EP representatives from today until the next EP elections, only 20% of Croatians went to vote. Finally, there is a risk that a EU who is fighting back the current crisis situation cannot deliver for the high expectations that some Croatians have raised on the accession. On its benefit, the small size of the country should ease the whole process of assimilation of the new country.

There are also reasons to believe that the accession of Croatia is good news. Looking back just 20 years ago, Croatia was being devastated by a war. The EU was created to restore trust among nations and to provide a durable peace, and the accession of Croatia is an encouraging message to other ex-Yugoslavian republics to speed up the process and make themselves ready for the EU. The real end of the Yugoslav wars will be when they all belong to the EU and they will solve their differences through negotiations and diplomacy. Do not take me for a fool; I know it will not be an easy process and neither a fast one.

Some people are wondering what can be the benefit of the accession for the rest of the EU. We have had Croatians inside AEGEE for more than 20 years and we have seen how big contribution they can make to building Europe from a youth perspective. Now it will be the EU28 who will have the opportunity to bring out the great potential of the Croatian citizens in benefit of all the European Union.

 

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Youth demands co-mananagement in the European Union /youth-comananagement-eu/ Wed, 12 Jun 2013 08:00:58 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=632 On June 5th and 6th, AEGEE-Europe hosted a 2 days event in the European Parliament, where different Belgian and European NGOs had the opportunity to discuss the possibilities for Co-Management in the European institutions, together with representatives from the European Commission, the European Parliament, the Council of Europe and its Advisory Council on Youth, and the European Youth Forum. The event was hosted by the MEP Hannes Swoboda, who is also President of the S&D Group in the European Parliament and financed through the Youth in Action Grant. AEGEE-Brussels was organising the conference together with AEGEE-Europe.

What is exactly the Co-Management that we are proposing? We want more than just being consulted in the EU decision-making process. Young people should be involved in the three phases: consultation, decision and monitoring. Co-management is a unique model where governments and youth representatives sit together to decide on the political and strategic priorities of the youth sector, including the budget allocations in accordance with these priorities, and to monitor the sector’s annual or pluriannual programmes. We have seen that this scheme works in the Council of Europe and we want to put it into practice in the European Union.

On the first morning, we had two panels moderated by Marco Grdosic, former president of AEGEE-Europe, where we could get a lot of input.

In the first panel there were interventions from Marian Harkin, MEP from the ALDE group; Pascal Lejeune, head of Youth Unit of the European Commission; André Jaques-Dodin,  Head of the Intergovernmental Division of the youth department of the Council of Europe; Maria Paschou, Chair of the Advisory Council on Youth of the CoE; Peter Matjaši?, President of the European Youth Forum (YFJ); and Luca Scarpiello, Secretary of the Youth Intergroup of the European Parliament. They debated the current structure of the Council of Europe as an example of best practices, and explored the benefits of having a similar system for the European Institutions.

The second panel counted on the participation of Giuseppe Porcaro, Secretary General of the European Youth Forum; Kaisu Suopanki from Allianssi, the Finnish Youth Council, which has already implemented a co-management scheme; Ivailo Kalfin, MEP from the S&D Group; and André-Jacques Dodin. They were discussing the different possibilities of implementing the co-management in the EU institutions.

During the afternoon session on Wednesday, two parallel sessions were scheduled to discuss in depth and work in small groups. On one workshop, the focus was on the possible structure for a youth co-management scheme in the EU and the fields where the co-management would be needed; on the second workshop, the discussion was focused on legitimacy and representation of the European youth in this new structure.

On Thursday, the  participants presented the results of the previous day work to MEP Hannes Swoboda, president of the S&D Group in the EP. After that, they prepared the follow-up of the conference. This process was just initiated and has a long way ahead, but we young Europeans want to play a bigger role in the EU!

We would like to thank all participants for their active contribution, their ideas and their involvement in the whole process. Without them, and the expertise from their organizations in many cases, we could never have achieved such a big outcome. Thanks also to the European Parliament for hosting us, specially MEP Hannes Swoboda, his office and the S&D group of the EP for their support.

With this event, we wanted to take the lead in proposing a greater involvement of young people inside the European Institutions, because we believe that we need to involve them when the discussions are taken, in order to make young people more aware and more interested of what European Politics is about. The co-management system is a very open and transparent system for youth and in the current context, where young people’s need are being one priority of decision-makers, we think that it is very important to take into account the input of young people. We hope that in the future there would be a body of young people representing European youth who could sit equally with the European Commission when making decisions about youth issues.

 

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What can young people do for Europe? /europe-2020-young-people-elections-2014/ /europe-2020-young-people-elections-2014/#comments Wed, 15 May 2013 19:53:57 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=614 In response to Wat kan Europa voor de jongeren doen? (translation: What can Europe do for young people?) by Bart Staes (Belgian MEP for Greens/EFA), published in Knack on May 9, 2013.

 

“Ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country.” This sentence from the inaugural speech of John F. Kennedy has been used so often and in so many situations, and yet it can hardly be called a cliché. Also in this context it still remains true and powerful: European young people are not yet lost.

The situation is dire. So much cannot be denied. Youth unemployment keeps rising month after month and it is approaching the threshold of 25% in the euro zone. But does this turn people away from Europe? Does the average young person know enough about Europe for this? And what future do young people see for the European Union in 2020?

These and other questions formed the content of the first edition of the Europe on Track project, winner of the European Charlemagne Youth Prize 2013 last week in Aachen. At a time when the European integration project is being questioned, and the outlooks for many young people look bleak at best, AEGEE / European Students’ Forum has taken the initiative to question European youth on their vision of Europe and their role in it. As one of the six ambassadors, Mathieu Soete covered over 7,500 km by train to interview 200 young people.

From Brussels to Istanbul, many interviewed youth were indeed anxious about their current and future chances on the job market, both at home and abroad. Many don’t stand idly by however, and are further training themselves in youth organisations, on projects, through non-formal education. Yet they are aware that even this is often not enough, for non-formal education is still being insufficiently recognised, and it remains difficult for them to turn this invaluable experience into a meaningful job. The Youth Guarantee can play a role here, but this scheme can still be improved.

Moreover, for many the European integration project remains limited to politics and business, while on the ground many barriers remain before we can truly speak of a free movement of citizens. Some examples include the difficulties in transition from the French education to the German job market, or the mutual incompatibility of the Dutch and Belgian residence rules, or the drastic consequences of the fast integration of the new member states.

Few however, have lost their faith in a better Europe. Among youth the interest for European politics is low, and many indicate “not knowing what they are doing there in Brussels”, but this largely seems to be a reflection at the European level of the lack of interest or even aversion to national politics. Remains of communist regimes, insufficient attention for youth in political programmes, and a feeling of impotence to chance any of this, are the most commonly cited reasons for this disinterest.

But it is not yet too late. As European Parliament president Martin Schultz said last week: “The elections of 2014 will be crucial to regain the confidence.” Many elections and other events have already been called crucial and just as quickly have been replaced with other horizons, but we cannot afford to be discouraged by this. Each opportunity to turn the tide of Euroscepticism can be the decisive one. The European Students’ Forum is therefore industriously preparing the successor of its 2009 success project: Y Vote.

Many young people are more than ever concerned with the institutional discussions and the changes these could bring about. For many a stronger union is indispensable to get us out of this crisis, and a federal Europe seems a done deal: it is either integration or disintegration for this Erasmus-generation. Young people are most easily convinced by other young people, and it is therefore the task of these enthusiastic young Europeans to engage others and pull them along. This is exactly the aim of the Y Vote 2014 project as well, by again heading to the UK with a campaign on Euroscepticism.

But they cannot do this alone. Regardless of the number of projects and campaigns to stimulate young people’s interest in European politics and integration, political programmes and discourses must also be adapted to offer them a point of recognition and to demonstrate that Europe has a tangible — and mostly positive — influence in their daily life. Too often politicians at the national level blame Brussels for unpopular measures, and media report only on the negative aspects of European integration.

Young people are shouting that we can no longer continue like this, and they are prepared to do something about this. The least European policy-makers could do, is to actively support and guide these young people. We will gladly cooperate with this!

Adapted from Mathieu Soete’s blog.
Mathieu is Policy Officer for Sustainability in AEGEE-Europe.

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Happy birthday AEGEE /happy-birthday-aegee/ Tue, 16 Apr 2013 07:15:19 +0000 http://aegee.blogactiv.eu/?p=583 28 years ago, the very first EGEE conference in Paris started.

Happy Birthday AEGEE-Europe!

Making Europe our home since 1985.

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